What The Fuck Is My Mashup

The fruits of a Sunday hangover; What The Fuck Is My Mashup? is an idea generator for ridiculous (but sometimes plausible) mashups. Read : What The Fuck Is My Mashup? »

Posted on 07 Feb 2011
5 Comments
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Recursive Subdivision

This is a little algorithm I sketched in my moleskin on the train and for once had the free time to build. The idea is to split a convex polygon between two line segments, creating two new polygons. Each shape is pushed into a queue ready to be subdivided itself. Despite the simplicity of the algorithm, the results are quite nice and with certain configurations often far removed from what I would have expected – surprise is always good. Read : Recursive Polygon Subdivision »

Posted on 27 May 2010
21 Comments
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Ishihara Drawing 1

These are some old prints that I made for an exhibition called Ishihara, back in 2008. They’re created using a tool I built called Rotator, which degrades vector drawings as they are printed to a bitmap, whilst following the path of a random wander. I found them on an old hard drive and thought I’d share. Read : Generative Prints for Ishihara »

Posted on 12 Feb 2010
18 Comments
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Bitmapdata Colour Palette

My previous post explained and provided a very simple method for extracting colours from a BitmapData image, by averaging the colours in specific areas. This can have several applications, for example it features in a large amount of prototypes for the update to my Motion Tracking engine. However, if you want to create an accurate and representative colour palette from an image it has several flaws, the most obvious being that by averaging colours, you are actually removing or diluting the striking but perhaps less frequent colours in the image – the very colours which often make an image’s colour palette so exiting!

So, if we’re to extract an exciting and more representative palette from an image, we need a more intelligent algorithm; one which takes into account what makes a colour palette interesting – the contrasts and juxtapositions of colours within the image. Read : BitmapData Colour Palette »

Posted on 11 Oct 2008
55 Comments
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BitmapData Average Colours

If you want a very simple way of extracting a colour palette from an image, one technique would be to average the colour values within specific areas. Averaging colour values is almost identical to averaging numbers, except with the added initial step of finding the red, green and blue components of the colour. To do this we can use bitwise operators, in this case bitwise shift, to perform fast operations on each bit inside the unsigned integer returned by getPixel or getPixel32. If you want to know more about bitwise operators, Moock has written a detailed and, as ever, very clear article on where, when and why to use bitewise operations. You can read it here.

So once you’re familiar with how to shift the bits of an integer, you can easily get the RGB values from a 24 bit hexadecimal by moving the bits to the right by a certain amount using the bitwise right shift operator (>>). Read : BitmapData Average Colours »

Posted on 10 Oct 2008
26 Comments
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About me

Soulwire is a weblog by Justin Windle; a Senior Interactive Developer at Fi (Fantasy Interactive), Stockholm – I often Tweet, Flik, Link and Vim.

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