“An experimental particle based audio sequencer, created in Flash using Tonfall; the new open source AS3 audio engine produced by Andre Michelle …”

Tonfall Sequencer

(You can drag each node and switch off the wander behaviour to create your own compositions).

At Flash on the Beach this year, I had the privilege of seeing Andre Michelle speak. It was great to hear him explain some of his fantastic work behind audiotool and to see and hear some more of his audio experiments.

He also introduced Tonfall, which is an open source AS3 framework designed to get people started with Audio programming in Flash. From the horses mouth; “Tonfall introduces only a vague design of an audio engine and is rather focussed on readability and simplicity than performance optimizations”.

I know that I’m not alone in feeling inspired by what Andre has done for the Flash platform, particularly when it comes to audio, yet lack the knowledge he has invested so much time and hard work in acquiring. The fact that he’s now sharing it with the ret of us for free was more than enough impetus to have a crack at it myself.

So this is my first test with the framework, which although not extensively documented (at the time of writing), was quite easy to pick up and get going with.

This sequencer is based around physical nodes, which connect to produce a variety of tones. There are two types of node, a neuron and a receptor, which are connected by synapses (apologies for the trite analogies). Neurons fire periodically, and if within a certain proximity of a receptor, this message is sent at a fixed speed along the bridging synapse. When the message arrives, the receptor is activated and responds by queuing it’s individual tone within the audio engine. Each receptor owns a randomly assigned note, and each neuron a randomly assigned octave; therefor a receptor will play it’s note in several different octaves depending on which neuron causes it to fire.

The download includes the builds of Tonfall by Andre Michelle and Minimal Comps by Keith Peters that I’m using.

Download: Particle Sequencer
Posted on 09 Oct 2010
71 Comments
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  1. 6 years ago We Love… » Blog Archive » AS3 Particle Node Sequencer

    [...] guys over at soulwire.co.uk have been busy creating an experimental particle based audio sequencer  in Flash using Tonfall; [...]

  2. 6 years ago Justin Windle's AS3 Particle Node Sequencer, Flash + Tonfall

    [...] The Particle Sequencer is available to download from Soulwire. [...]

  3. 6 years ago The Tonfall Flash based sequencer : Steelberry Clones

    [...] Try it here >> [...]

  4. 6 years ago PIA Blog / Productivity by Design » Notre revue de presse (22/10/2010)

    [...] et interactive. Cette dernière utilise le moteur open-source Tonfall, d’Andre Michelle. Consulter l’article  TechnologiesFlash Builder et la couverture de codeSur son Labs, Adobe propose un plugin [...]

  5. 6 years ago links for 2010-11-17 at adam hoyle presents suckmypixel

    [...] AS3 Particle Node Sequencer › Experimenting with the Tonfall Audio Engine › Soulwire "This sequencer is based around physical nodes, which connect to produce a variety of tones. There are two types of node, a neuron and a receptor, which are connected by synapses (apologies for the trite analogies). Neurons fire periodically, and if within a certain proximity of a receptor, this message is sent at a fixed speed along the bridging synapse. When the message arrives, the receptor is activated and responds by queuing it’s individual tone within the audio engine. Each receptor owns a randomly assigned note, and each neuron a randomly assigned octave; therefor a receptor will play it’s note in several different octaves depending on which neuron causes it to fire." (tags: as3 audio flash sequencer sound music interface experimental tonfall soundtoys) [...]

  6. 6 years ago [Tonfall] Sound API Framework - Flashforum

    [...] WavDecoder (Abspielen von WAV Audio Dateien) Andere Beispiele:AS3 Particle Node Sequencer [...]

  7. 5 years ago Live Instrumentation in Flash Part 6 – Some Demos « Benjamin Farrell

    [...] AS3 Particle Node Sequencer [...]

  8. 5 years ago Live Instrumentation in Flash « Benjamin Farrell

    [...] AS3 Particle Node Sequencer [...]

  1. Ad 6 years ago

    Mate this is fantastic, I’ve just spent ages playing with the settings and dragging the trigger neurons around. Now I’ve just leaft a couple of nodes wandering with a low proximity setting which gives nice result. This could be my ambient writing music for the rest of the day! Love it!
    Ad

    Reply to this comment

    1. Soulwire 6 years ago

      Haha, Cheers dude, glad you like!

      Yeah Al suggested we wire it up in the ‘chill out’ room at parties to provide a bit of audiovisual ambience when people decide enough is enough and crash out. I want to rebuild this in Processing or Open Frameworks and make each node configurable with samples and it’s own steering behaviours.

      Good luck with the writing (PhD I presume?) and catch you soon…

  2. Andre Michelle 6 years ago

    Great work! Thanks for working with Tonfall. It sounds lovely.

    Reply to this comment

    1. Soulwire 6 years ago

      Cheers Andre :) Thank you for the great framework and I’m honoured you had a look at my little experiment. Keep up the inspirational work!

  3. makemachine 6 years ago

    Nice work! I’ve been experimenting in audio processing with Flash throughout the summer. The Sound API in Flash is so minimal ( in a good way ). Coupled with Flash’s graphics capabilities, AS3 makes for a really great place to start learning signal processing and visualizing audio. Looking forward to more experiments!

    Reply to this comment

    1. Soulwire 6 years ago

      Hi Jeremy. Thanks for your kind words. Great work over at MakeMachine; I’m really getting into it – it’ll be my reading material for the bus journey I’m currently on! Looking forward to the next round(s) of wavetable synthesis.

  4. Lawrie 6 years ago

    Love it. Thanks for sharing the source too!
    I’ve been playing with dynamic audio to use with a flash midi server I’ve made, so I’m looking forwards to trying out Tonfall.

    Reply to this comment

  5. Tony Lukasavage 6 years ago

    This a fantastic! Some truly inspirational work here. Thanks for the source.

    Reply to this comment

  6. bradders 6 years ago

    updated site…. love it mate – like the Discussion section.

    Nice touch

    hope all is well dude

    Reply to this comment

  7. Kelvin Luck 6 years ago

    Wow – really nice work :) Sounds and looks awesome!

    Reply to this comment

  8. Kelvin Luck 6 years ago

    Wow – really nice work. Sounds and looks awesome!

    Reply to this comment

  9. Tom 6 years ago

    404 on the .swf link

    Reply to this comment

  10. Sebastian 6 years ago

    This is great! I was introduced to this website from Joel and Paul from AUCB – they said you were a graduate. I am basing my current project on data visualization and infographics on Flash/actionscript.

    Looks like your going to be a targeted research victim.

    Sebastian

    Reply to this comment

    1. Soulwire 6 years ago

      Nice one. Yeah, hit me up any time if you need to (email is on the about page). Say hi to Joel and Paul for me!

  11. Chris 6 years ago

    Awesome. Love it. Looks and sounds great!

    Reply to this comment

  12. iki_xx 6 years ago

    Mesmerizing!
    Seriously, I’ve seen a lot of things in flash ,and none of them grabbed my attention like this beautiful piece of work!.

    Reply to this comment